Twelve years a slave by Northup, Solomon, 1808-1863?

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"A harrowing memoir about one of the darkest periods in American historyBorn a free man in New York, Solomon Northup was abducted in Washington, D.C., in 1841 and spent the next twelve years of his life in captivity as a slave on a Louisiana cotton plantation. After his rescue, he published this exceptionally vivid and detailed account of slave life--perhaps the best written of all the slave narratives. It became an immediate bestseller and today is recognized for its unusual insight and eloquence as one of the very few portraits of American slavery produced by someone as educated as Solomon Northup, or by someone with the dual perspective of having been both a free man and a slave"--

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Table of Contents

  1. General editor essay / Henry Louis Gates Jr
  2. Introduction / Ira Berlin
  3. Suggestions for further reading
  4. Twelve Years A Slave:
  5. Editor's Preface
  6. Chapter 1:
  7. Introductory
  8. Ancestry
  9. Northup family
  10. Birth and parentage
  11. Mintus Northup
  12. Marriage with Anne Hampton
  13. Good Resolutions
  14. Champlain canal
  15. Rafting excursion to Canada
  16. Farming
  17. Violin
  18. Cooking
  19. Removal to Saratoga
  20. Parker and Perry
  21. Slaves and slavery
  22. Children
  23. Beginning of sorrow
  24. Chapter 2:
  25. Two strangers
  26. Circus company
  27. Departure from Saratoga
  28. Ventriloquism and legerdemain
  29. Journey to New York
  30. Free papers
  31. Brown and Hamilton
  32. Haste to reach the circus
  33. Arrival in Washington
  34. Funeral of Harrison
  35. Sudden sickness
  36. Torment of thirst
  37. Receding light
  38. Insensibility
  39. Chains and darkness
  40. Chapter 3:
  41. Painful meditations
  42. James H Burch
  43. Williams slave pen in Washington
  44. Lackey, Radburn
  45. Assert my freedom
  46. Anger of the trader
  47. Paddle and cat-o-ninetails
  48. Whipping
  49. New acquaintances
  50. Ray, Williams, and Randall
  51. Arrival of little Emily and her mother in the pen
  52. Maternal sorrows
  53. Story of Eliza
  54. Chapter 4:
  55. Eliza's sorrows
  56. Preparation to embark
  57. Driven through the streets of Washington
  58. Hail, Columbia
  59. Tomb of Washington
  60. Clem Ray
  61. Breakfast on the streamer
  62. Happy birds
  63. Aquia Creek
  64. Fredericksburgh
  65. Arrival in Richmond
  66. Goodin and his slave pen
  67. Robert, of Cincinnati
  68. David and his wife
  69. Mary and Lethe
  70. Clem's return
  71. His subsequent escape to Canada
  72. Brig Orleans
  73. James H Burch
  74. Chapter 5:
  75. Arrival at Norfolk
  76. Frederick and Maria
  77. Arthur, the freeman
  78. Appointed steward
  79. Jim, Cuffee, and Jenny
  80. Storm
  81. Bahama Banks
  82. Calm
  83. Conspiracy
  84. Long-boat
  85. Small-pox
  86. Death of Robert
  87. Manning, the sailor
  88. Meeting in the forecastle
  89. Letter
  90. Arrival at New Orleans
  91. Arthur's rescue
  92. Theophilus Freeman, the consignee
  93. Platt
  94. First night in the New Orleans slave pen
  95. Chapter 6:
  96. Freeman's industry
  97. Cleanliness and clothes
  98. Exercising in the show room
  99. Dance
  100. Bob, the fiddler
  101. Arrival of customers
  102. Slaves examined
  103. Old gentleman of New Orleans
  104. Sale of David, Caroline and Lethe
  105. Parting of Randal and Eliza
  106. Small-pox
  107. Hospital
  108. Recovery and return to Freeman's slave pen
  109. Purchaser of Eliza, Harry, and Platt
  110. Eliza's agony on parting from little Emily
  111. Streamboat Rodolph
  112. Departure from New Orleans
  113. William Ford
  114. Arrival at Alexandria, on Red River
  115. Resolutions
  116. Great Pine Woods
  117. Wild cattle
  118. Martin's summer residence
  119. Texas road
  120. Arrival at Master Ford's
  121. Rose
  122. Mistress Ford
  123. Sally, and her children
  124. John, the cook
  125. Walter, Sam, and Antony
  126. Mills on Indian Creek
  127. Sabbath days
  128. Sam's conversion
  129. Profit of kindness
  130. Rafting
  131. Adam Taydem, the little white man
  132. Cascalla and his tribe
  133. Indian Ball
  134. John M Tibets
  135. Storm approaching
  136. Chapter 8:
  137. Ford's embarrassments
  138. Sale to Tibests
  139. Chattel mortgage
  140. Mistress Ford's plantation on Bayou Boeuf
  141. Description of the latter
  142. Ford's brother-in-law, Peter Tanner
  143. Meeting with Eliza
  144. She still mourns for her children
  145. Ford's overseer, Chapin
  146. Tibeats' abuse
  147. Keg of nails
  148. First fight with Tibeats
  149. His discomfiture and castigation
  150. Attempt to hang me
  151. Chapin's interference and speech
  152. Unhappy reflections
  153. Abrupt departure of Tibeats, Cook and Ramsay
  154. Lawson and the brown mule
  155. Message to the pine woods
  156. Chapter 9:
  157. Hot sun
  158. Yet bound
  159. Cords sink into my flesh
  160. Chapin's uneasiness
  161. Speculation
  162. Rachel, and her cup of water
  163. Suffering increases
  164. Happiness of slavery
  165. Arrival of Ford
  166. He cuts the Cords which bind me, and takes the rope from my neck
  167. Misery
  168. Gathering of the slaves in Eliza's cabin
  169. Their kindness
  170. Rachel repeats the occurrences of the day
  171. Lawson entertains his companions with an account of his ride
  172. Chapin's apprehensions of Tibeats
  173. Hired to Peter Tanner
  174. Peter expounds the scriptures
  175. Description of the stocks
  176. Chapter 10:
  177. Return to Tibeats
  178. Impossibility of pleasing him
  179. He attacks me with a hatchet
  180. Struggle over the broad-axe
  181. Temptation to murder him
  182. Escape across the plantation
  183. Observations from the fence
  184. Tibeats approaches, followed by the hounds
  185. They take my track
  186. Their loud yells
  187. They almost overtake me
  188. I reach the water
  189. Hounds confused
  190. Moccasin snakes
  191. Alligators
  192. Night in the "Great Pacoudrie Swamp"
  193. Sounds of life
  194. North-West course
  195. Emerge into the pine woods
  196. Slave and his young master
  197. Arrival at Ford's
  198. Food and rest
  199. Chapter 11:
  200. Mistress' garden
  201. Crimson and golden fruit
  202. Orange and pomegranate tress
  203. Return to Bayou Beouf
  204. Master Ford's remarks on the way
  205. Meeting with Tibeats
  206. His account of the chase
  207. Ford censures his brutality
  208. Arrival at the plantation
  209. Astonishment of the slaves on seeing me
  210. Anticipated flogging
  211. Kentucky John
  212. Mr Eldret, the planter
  213. Eldret's Sam
  214. Trip to the "big cane brake"
  215. Tradition of "Sutton's Field"
  216. Forest trees
  217. Gnats and mosquitoes
  218. Arrival of black women in the big cane
  219. Lumber women
  220. Sudden appearances of Tibeats
  221. His provoking treatment
  222. Visit to Bayou Boeuf
  223. Slave pass
  224. Southern hospitality
  225. Last of Eliza
  226. Sale to Edwin Epps. Chapter 12:
  227. Personal appearance of Epps
  228. Epps, drunk and sober
  229. Glimpse of his history
  230. Cotton growing
  231. Mode of ploughing and preparing ground
  232. Of planting
  233. Of hoeing, of picking, of treating raw hands
  234. Difference in cotton pickers
  235. Patsey a remarkable one
  236. Tasked according to ability
  237. Beauty of cotton field
  238. Slave's labors
  239. Fear on approaching the Gin-house
  240. Weighting
  241. Chores
  242. Cabin life
  243. Corn mill
  244. Uses of the gourd
  245. Fear of oversleeping
  246. Fear continually
  247. Mode of cultivating corn
  248. Sweet potatoes
  249. Fertility of the soil
  250. Fattening hogs
  251. Preserving bacon
  252. Raising cattle
  253. Shooting
  254. Matches
  255. Garden products
  256. Flowers and verdure
  257. Chapter 13:
  258. Curious Axe-helve
  259. Symptoms of approaching illness
  260. Continue to decline
  261. Whip ineffectual
  262. Confined to the cabin
  263. Visit by Dr Wines
  264. Partial recovery
  265. Failure at cotton picking
  266. What may be heard on Epps' plantation
  267. Lashes graduated
  268. Epps in a Whipping mood
  269. Epps in a dancing mood
  270. Description of the dance
  271. Loss of rest no excuse
  272. Epps' characteristics
  273. Jim Burns
  274. Removal from Huff Power to Bayou Boeuf
  275. Description of Uncle Abram; of Wiley; of Aunt Phebe; of Bob, Henry, and Edward; of Patsey; with a genealogical account of each
  276. Something of their past history, and peculiar characteristics
  277. Jealousy and lust
  278. Patsey, the victim
  279. Chapter 14:
  280. Destruction of the cotton crop in 1845
  281. Demand for laborers in St Mary's Parish
  282. Sent thither in a drove
  283. Order of the march
  284. Grand Coteau
  285. Hired to Judge Turner on Bayou Salle
  286. Appointed driver in his sugar house
  287. Sunday services
  288. Slave furniture; how obtained
  289. Party at Yarney's in Centreville
  290. Good fortune
  291. Captain of the steamer
  292. His refusal to secret me
  293. Return to Bayou Boeuf
  294. Sight of Tibeats
  295. Patsey's sorrows
  296. Tumult and contention
  297. Hunting the coon and opossum
  298. Cunning of the latter
  299. Lean condition of the slave
  300. Description of the fish trap
  301. Murder of the man from Natchez
  302. Epps challenged by Marshall
  303. Influence of slavery
  304. Love of freedom
  305. Chapter 15:
  306. Labors on sugar plantations
  307. Mode of planting cane
  308. Of hoeing cane
  309. Cane ricks
  310. Cutting cane
  311. Description of the cane knife
  312. Winrowing
  313. Preparing for succeeding crops
  314. Description of Hawkin's sugar mill on Bayou Boeuf
  315. Christmas holidays
  316. Carnival season of the children of bondage
  317. Christmas supper
  318. Red, the favorite color
  319. Violin, and the consolation it afforded
  320. Christmas dance
  321. Lively, the coquette
  322. Sam Roberts, and his rivals
  323. Slave songs
  324. Southern life as it is
  325. Three days in the year
  326. System of marriage
  327. Uncle Abram's contempt of matrimony
  328. Chapter 16:
  329. Overseers
  330. How they are armed and accompanied
  331. Homicide
  332. His execution at Marksville
  333. Slave-drivers
  334. Appointed driver on removing to Bayou Boeuf
  335. Practice make perfect
  336. Epps attempt to cut Platt's throat
  337. Escape from him
  338. Protected by the mistress
  339. Forbids reading and writing
  340. Obtain a sheet of paper after nine years' effort
  341. Letter
  342. Armsby, the mean white
  343. Partially confide in him
  344. His treachery
  345. Epps' suspicions
  346. How they were quieted
  347. Burning the letter
  348. Armsby leaves the Bayou
  349. Disappointment and despair
  350. Chapter 17:
  351. Wiley disregards the counsels of Aunt Phebe and Uncle Abram, and is caught by the patrollers
  352. Organization and duties of the latter
  353. Wiley runs away
  354. Speculations in regard to him
  355. His unexpected return
  356. His capture on Red River, and confinement in Alexandria jail
  357. Discovered by Joseph B Roberts
  358. Subduing dogs in anticipation of escape
  359. Fugitives in the great pine woods
  360. Captured by Adam Taydem and the Indians
  361. Augustus killed by dogs
  362. Nelly, Eldret's slave woman
  363. Story of Celeste
  364. Concerted movement
  365. Lew Cheney, the traitor
  366. Idea of insurrection
  367. Chapter 18:
  368. O'Neil, the tanner
  369. Conversation with Aunt Phebe overheard
  370. Epps in the tanning business
  371. Stabbing of Uncle Abram
  372. Ugly wound
  373. Epps is jealous
  374. Patsey missing
  375. Her return from Shaw's
  376. Harriet, Shaw's black wife
  377. Epps enraged
  378. Patsey denies his charges
  379. She is tied down naked to four stakes
  380. Inhuman flogging
  381. Flaying of Patsey
  382. Beauty of the day
  383. Bucket of salt water
  384. Dress stiff with blood
  385. Patsey grows melancholy
  386. Her idea of god and eternity
  387. Of heaven and freedom
  388. Effect of slave-whipping
  389. Epps' oldest son
  390. Child is father to the man
  391. Chapter 19:
  392. Avery, of Bayou Rouge
  393. Peculiarity of dwellings
  394. Epps builds a new house
  395. Bass, the carpenter
  396. His noble qualities
  397. His personal appearance and eccentricities
  398. Bass and Epps discuss the question of slavery
  399. Epps' opinion of Bass
  400. I make myself known to him
  401. Our conversation
  402. His surprise
  403. Midnight meeting on the Bayou bank
  404. Bass' assurances
  405. Declares war against slavery
  406. Why I did not disclose my history
  407. Bass writes letters
  408. Copy of his letter to Messrs Parker and Perry
  409. Fever of suspense
  410. Disappointments
  411. Bass endeavors to cheer me
  412. My faith in him
  413. Chapter 20:
  414. Bass faithful to his word
  415. His arrival on Christmas Eve
  416. Difficulty of obtaining an interview
  417. Meeting in the cabin
  418. Non-arrival of the letter
  419. Bass announces his intention to proceed North
  420. Christmas
  421. Conversation between Epps and bass
  422. Young Mistress McCoy, the beauty of Bayou Boeuf
  423. Ne plus ultra of dinners
  424. Music and dancing
  425. Presence of the Mistress
  426. Her exceeding beauty
  427. Last slave dance
  428. William Pierce
  429. Oversleep myself
  430. Last whipping
  431. Despondency
  432. Cold morning
  433. Epps' threats
  434. Passing carriage
  435. Strangers approaching through the cotton field
  436. Last hour on Bayou Boeuf
  437. Chapter 21:
  438. Letter reaches Saratoga
  439. Is forwarded to Anne
  440. Is laid before Henry B Northup
  441. Statute of May 14, 1840
  442. Its provisions
  443. Anne's memorial to the governor
  444. Affidavits accompanying it
  445. Senator Soule's letter
  446. Departure of the agent appointed by the governor
  447. Arrival at Marksville
  448. Hon John P Waddill
  449. Conversation on New York politics
  450. It suggests a fortunate idea
  451. Meeting with Bass
  452. Secret out
  453. Legal proceedings instituted
  454. Departure of Northup and the sheriff from Marksville for Bayou Boeuf
  455. Arrangements on the way
  456. Reach Epps' plantation
  457. Discover his slaves in the cotton field
  458. Meeting
  459. Farewell
  460. Chapter 22:
  461. Arrival in New Orleans
  462. Glimpse of Freeman
  463. Genois, the recorder
  464. His description of Solomon
  465. Reach Charleston
  466. Interrupted by custom house officers
  467. Pass through Richmond
  468. Arrival in Washington
  469. Burch arrested
  470. Shekels and thorn
  471. Their testimony
  472. Burch acquitted
  473. Arrest of Solomon
  474. Burch withdraws the complaint
  475. Higher tribunal
  476. Departure from Washington
  477. Arrival at Sandy Hill
  478. Old friends and familiar scenes
  479. Proceed to Glens Falls
  480. Meeting with Anne, Margaret, and Elizabeth
  481. Solomon Northup Staunton
  482. Incidents
  483. Conclusion
  484. Appendix
  485. Index.

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082 0 0 |a 306.3/62092  |a B  |2 23 
092 |a 306.362  |b N819s3 
049 |a PLFF 
100 1 |a Northup, Solomon,  |d 1808-1863? 
245 1 0 |a Twelve years a slave /  |c Solomon Northup ; introduction by Ira Berlin ; general editor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. 
246 3 |a 12 years a slave 
260 |a New York :  |b Penguin Books,  |c 2012. 
300 |a xxxvi, 240 pages :  |b illustrations, music ;  |c 20 cm. 
336 |a text  |b txt  |2 rdacontent 
337 |a unmediated  |b n  |2 rdamedia 
338 |a volume  |b nc  |2 rdacarrier 
490 1 |a Penguin classics 
504 |a Includes bibliographical references and index. 
520 |a "A harrowing memoir about one of the darkest periods in American historyBorn a free man in New York, Solomon Northup was abducted in Washington, D.C., in 1841 and spent the next twelve years of his life in captivity as a slave on a Louisiana cotton plantation. After his rescue, he published this exceptionally vivid and detailed account of slave life--perhaps the best written of all the slave narratives. It became an immediate bestseller and today is recognized for its unusual insight and eloquence as one of the very few portraits of American slavery produced by someone as educated as Solomon Northup, or by someone with the dual perspective of having been both a free man and a slave"--  |c Provided by publisher. 
520 |a "Born a free man in New York State in 1808, Solomon Northup was kidnapped in Washington, D.C., in 1841. He spent the next twelve harrowing years of his life as a slave on a Louisiana cotton plantation. During this time he was frequently abused and often afraid for his life. After regaining his freedom in 1853, Northup decided to publish this gripping autobiographical account of his captivity. As an educated man, Northup was able to present an exceptionally detailed and accurate description of slave life and plantation society. Indeed, this book is probably the fullest, most realistic picture of the "peculiar institution" during the three decades before the Civil War. Moreover, Northup tells his story both from the viewpoint of an outsider, who had experienced thirty years of freedom and dignity in the United States before his capture, and as a slave, reduced to total bondage and submission. Very few personal accounts of American slavery were written by slaves with a similar history. Published in 1853, Northup's book found a ready audience and almost immediately became a bestseller. Aside from its vivid depiction of the detention, transportation, and sale of slaves, TWELVE YEARS A SLAVE is admired for its classic accounts of cotton and sugar production, its uncannily precise recall of people, times, and places, and the compelling details that recreate the daily routine of slaves in the Gulf South"--  |c Provided by publisher. 
505 0 |a General editor essay / Henry Louis Gates Jr -- Introduction / Ira Berlin -- Suggestions for further reading -- Twelve Years A Slave: -- Editor's Preface -- Chapter 1: -- Introductory -- Ancestry -- Northup family -- Birth and parentage -- Mintus Northup -- Marriage with Anne Hampton -- Good Resolutions -- Champlain canal -- Rafting excursion to Canada -- Farming -- Violin -- Cooking -- Removal to Saratoga -- Parker and Perry -- Slaves and slavery -- Children -- Beginning of sorrow -- Chapter 2: -- Two strangers -- Circus company -- Departure from Saratoga -- Ventriloquism and legerdemain -- Journey to New York -- Free papers -- Brown and Hamilton -- Haste to reach the circus -- Arrival in Washington -- Funeral of Harrison -- Sudden sickness -- Torment of thirst -- Receding light -- Insensibility -- Chains and darkness -- Chapter 3: -- Painful meditations -- James H Burch -- Williams slave pen in Washington -- Lackey, Radburn -- Assert my freedom -- Anger of the trader -- Paddle and cat-o-ninetails -- Whipping -- New acquaintances -- Ray, Williams, and Randall -- Arrival of little Emily and her mother in the pen -- Maternal sorrows -- Story of Eliza -- Chapter 4: -- Eliza's sorrows -- Preparation to embark -- Driven through the streets of Washington -- Hail, Columbia -- Tomb of Washington -- Clem Ray -- Breakfast on the streamer -- Happy birds -- Aquia Creek -- Fredericksburgh -- Arrival in Richmond -- Goodin and his slave pen -- Robert, of Cincinnati -- David and his wife -- Mary and Lethe -- Clem's return -- His subsequent escape to Canada -- Brig Orleans -- James H Burch -- Chapter 5: -- Arrival at Norfolk -- Frederick and Maria -- Arthur, the freeman -- Appointed steward -- Jim, Cuffee, and Jenny -- Storm -- Bahama Banks -- Calm -- Conspiracy -- Long-boat -- Small-pox -- Death of Robert -- Manning, the sailor -- Meeting in the forecastle -- Letter -- Arrival at New Orleans -- Arthur's rescue -- Theophilus Freeman, the consignee -- Platt -- First night in the New Orleans slave pen -- Chapter 6: -- Freeman's industry -- Cleanliness and clothes -- Exercising in the show room -- Dance -- Bob, the fiddler -- Arrival of customers -- Slaves examined -- Old gentleman of New Orleans -- Sale of David, Caroline and Lethe -- Parting of Randal and Eliza -- Small-pox -- Hospital -- Recovery and return to Freeman's slave pen -- Purchaser of Eliza, Harry, and Platt -- Eliza's agony on parting from little Emily -- Streamboat Rodolph -- Departure from New Orleans -- William Ford -- Arrival at Alexandria, on Red River -- Resolutions -- Great Pine Woods -- Wild cattle -- Martin's summer residence -- Texas road -- Arrival at Master Ford's -- Rose -- Mistress Ford -- Sally, and her children -- John, the cook -- Walter, Sam, and Antony -- Mills on Indian Creek -- Sabbath days -- Sam's conversion -- Profit of kindness -- Rafting -- Adam Taydem, the little white man -- Cascalla and his tribe -- Indian Ball -- John M Tibets -- Storm approaching -- Chapter 8: -- Ford's embarrassments -- Sale to Tibests -- Chattel mortgage -- Mistress Ford's plantation on Bayou Boeuf -- Description of the latter -- Ford's brother-in-law, Peter Tanner -- Meeting with Eliza -- She still mourns for her children -- Ford's overseer, Chapin -- Tibeats' abuse -- Keg of nails -- First fight with Tibeats -- His discomfiture and castigation -- Attempt to hang me -- Chapin's interference and speech -- Unhappy reflections -- Abrupt departure of Tibeats, Cook and Ramsay -- Lawson and the brown mule -- Message to the pine woods -- Chapter 9: -- Hot sun -- Yet bound -- Cords sink into my flesh -- Chapin's uneasiness -- Speculation -- Rachel, and her cup of water -- Suffering increases -- Happiness of slavery -- Arrival of Ford -- He cuts the Cords which bind me, and takes the rope from my neck -- Misery -- Gathering of the slaves in Eliza's cabin -- Their kindness -- Rachel repeats the occurrences of the day -- Lawson entertains his companions with an account of his ride -- Chapin's apprehensions of Tibeats -- Hired to Peter Tanner -- Peter expounds the scriptures -- Description of the stocks -- Chapter 10: -- Return to Tibeats -- Impossibility of pleasing him -- He attacks me with a hatchet -- Struggle over the broad-axe -- Temptation to murder him -- Escape across the plantation -- Observations from the fence -- Tibeats approaches, followed by the hounds -- They take my track -- Their loud yells -- They almost overtake me -- I reach the water -- Hounds confused -- Moccasin snakes -- Alligators -- Night in the "Great Pacoudrie Swamp" -- Sounds of life -- North-West course -- Emerge into the pine woods -- Slave and his young master -- Arrival at Ford's -- Food and rest -- Chapter 11: -- Mistress' garden -- Crimson and golden fruit -- Orange and pomegranate tress -- Return to Bayou Beouf -- Master Ford's remarks on the way -- Meeting with Tibeats -- His account of the chase -- Ford censures his brutality -- Arrival at the plantation -- Astonishment of the slaves on seeing me -- Anticipated flogging -- Kentucky John -- Mr Eldret, the planter -- Eldret's Sam -- Trip to the "big cane brake" -- Tradition of "Sutton's Field" -- Forest trees -- Gnats and mosquitoes -- Arrival of black women in the big cane -- Lumber women -- Sudden appearances of Tibeats -- His provoking treatment -- Visit to Bayou Boeuf -- Slave pass -- Southern hospitality -- Last of Eliza -- Sale to Edwin Epps. 
505 0 |a Chapter 12: -- Personal appearance of Epps -- Epps, drunk and sober -- Glimpse of his history -- Cotton growing -- Mode of ploughing and preparing ground -- Of planting -- Of hoeing, of picking, of treating raw hands -- Difference in cotton pickers -- Patsey a remarkable one -- Tasked according to ability -- Beauty of cotton field -- Slave's labors -- Fear on approaching the Gin-house -- Weighting -- Chores -- Cabin life -- Corn mill -- Uses of the gourd -- Fear of oversleeping -- Fear continually -- Mode of cultivating corn -- Sweet potatoes -- Fertility of the soil -- Fattening hogs -- Preserving bacon -- Raising cattle -- Shooting -- Matches -- Garden products -- Flowers and verdure -- Chapter 13: -- Curious Axe-helve -- Symptoms of approaching illness -- Continue to decline -- Whip ineffectual -- Confined to the cabin -- Visit by Dr Wines -- Partial recovery -- Failure at cotton picking -- What may be heard on Epps' plantation -- Lashes graduated -- Epps in a Whipping mood -- Epps in a dancing mood -- Description of the dance -- Loss of rest no excuse -- Epps' characteristics -- Jim Burns -- Removal from Huff Power to Bayou Boeuf -- Description of Uncle Abram; of Wiley; of Aunt Phebe; of Bob, Henry, and Edward; of Patsey; with a genealogical account of each -- Something of their past history, and peculiar characteristics -- Jealousy and lust -- Patsey, the victim -- Chapter 14: -- Destruction of the cotton crop in 1845 -- Demand for laborers in St Mary's Parish -- Sent thither in a drove -- Order of the march -- Grand Coteau -- Hired to Judge Turner on Bayou Salle -- Appointed driver in his sugar house -- Sunday services -- Slave furniture; how obtained -- Party at Yarney's in Centreville -- Good fortune -- Captain of the steamer -- His refusal to secret me -- Return to Bayou Boeuf -- Sight of Tibeats -- Patsey's sorrows -- Tumult and contention -- Hunting the coon and opossum -- Cunning of the latter -- Lean condition of the slave -- Description of the fish trap -- Murder of the man from Natchez -- Epps challenged by Marshall -- Influence of slavery -- Love of freedom -- Chapter 15: -- Labors on sugar plantations -- Mode of planting cane -- Of hoeing cane -- Cane ricks -- Cutting cane -- Description of the cane knife -- Winrowing -- Preparing for succeeding crops -- Description of Hawkin's sugar mill on Bayou Boeuf -- Christmas holidays -- Carnival season of the children of bondage -- Christmas supper -- Red, the favorite color -- Violin, and the consolation it afforded -- Christmas dance -- Lively, the coquette -- Sam Roberts, and his rivals -- Slave songs -- Southern life as it is -- Three days in the year -- System of marriage -- Uncle Abram's contempt of matrimony -- Chapter 16: -- Overseers -- How they are armed and accompanied -- Homicide -- His execution at Marksville -- Slave-drivers -- Appointed driver on removing to Bayou Boeuf -- Practice make perfect -- Epps attempt to cut Platt's throat -- Escape from him -- Protected by the mistress -- Forbids reading and writing -- Obtain a sheet of paper after nine years' effort -- Letter -- Armsby, the mean white -- Partially confide in him -- His treachery -- Epps' suspicions -- How they were quieted -- Burning the letter -- Armsby leaves the Bayou -- Disappointment and despair -- Chapter 17: -- Wiley disregards the counsels of Aunt Phebe and Uncle Abram, and is caught by the patrollers -- Organization and duties of the latter -- Wiley runs away -- Speculations in regard to him -- His unexpected return -- His capture on Red River, and confinement in Alexandria jail -- Discovered by Joseph B Roberts -- Subduing dogs in anticipation of escape -- Fugitives in the great pine woods -- Captured by Adam Taydem and the Indians -- Augustus killed by dogs -- Nelly, Eldret's slave woman -- Story of Celeste -- Concerted movement -- Lew Cheney, the traitor -- Idea of insurrection -- Chapter 18: -- O'Neil, the tanner -- Conversation with Aunt Phebe overheard -- Epps in the tanning business -- Stabbing of Uncle Abram -- Ugly wound -- Epps is jealous -- Patsey missing -- Her return from Shaw's -- Harriet, Shaw's black wife -- Epps enraged -- Patsey denies his charges -- She is tied down naked to four stakes -- Inhuman flogging -- Flaying of Patsey -- Beauty of the day -- Bucket of salt water -- Dress stiff with blood -- Patsey grows melancholy -- Her idea of god and eternity -- Of heaven and freedom -- Effect of slave-whipping -- Epps' oldest son -- Child is father to the man -- Chapter 19: -- Avery, of Bayou Rouge -- Peculiarity of dwellings -- Epps builds a new house -- Bass, the carpenter -- His noble qualities -- His personal appearance and eccentricities -- Bass and Epps discuss the question of slavery -- Epps' opinion of Bass -- I make myself known to him -- Our conversation -- His surprise -- Midnight meeting on the Bayou bank -- Bass' assurances -- Declares war against slavery -- Why I did not disclose my history -- Bass writes letters -- Copy of his letter to Messrs Parker and Perry -- Fever of suspense -- Disappointments -- Bass endeavors to cheer me -- My faith in him -- Chapter 20: -- Bass faithful to his word -- His arrival on Christmas Eve -- Difficulty of obtaining an interview -- Meeting in the cabin -- Non-arrival of the letter -- Bass announces his intention to proceed North -- Christmas -- Conversation between Epps and bass -- Young Mistress McCoy, the beauty of Bayou Boeuf -- Ne plus ultra of dinners -- Music and dancing -- Presence of the Mistress -- Her exceeding beauty -- Last slave dance -- William Pierce -- Oversleep myself -- Last whipping -- Despondency -- Cold morning -- Epps' threats -- Passing carriage -- Strangers approaching through the cotton field -- Last hour on Bayou Boeuf -- Chapter 21: -- Letter reaches Saratoga -- Is forwarded to Anne -- Is laid before Henry B Northup -- Statute of May 14, 1840 -- Its provisions -- Anne's memorial to the governor -- Affidavits accompanying it -- Senator Soule's letter -- Departure of the agent appointed by the governor -- Arrival at Marksville -- Hon John P Waddill -- Conversation on New York politics -- It suggests a fortunate idea -- Meeting with Bass -- Secret out -- Legal proceedings instituted -- Departure of Northup and the sheriff from Marksville for Bayou Boeuf -- Arrangements on the way -- Reach Epps' plantation -- Discover his slaves in the cotton field -- Meeting -- Farewell -- Chapter 22: -- Arrival in New Orleans -- Glimpse of Freeman -- Genois, the recorder -- His description of Solomon -- Reach Charleston -- Interrupted by custom house officers -- Pass through Richmond -- Arrival in Washington -- Burch arrested -- Shekels and thorn -- Their testimony -- Burch acquitted -- Arrest of Solomon -- Burch withdraws the complaint -- Higher tribunal -- Departure from Washington -- Arrival at Sandy Hill -- Old friends and familiar scenes -- Proceed to Glens Falls -- Meeting with Anne, Margaret, and Elizabeth -- Solomon Northup Staunton -- Incidents -- Conclusion -- Appendix -- Index. 
600 1 0 |a Northup, Solomon,  |d 1808-1863? 
650 0 |a Slaves  |z United States  |v Biography. 
650 0 |a Slaves' writings, American. 
650 0 |a African Americans  |v Biography. 
650 0 |a Plantation life  |z Louisiana  |x History  |y 19th century. 
650 0 |a Slavery  |z Louisiana  |x History  |y 19th century. 
700 1 |a Gates, Henry Louis,  |c Jr.,  |e editor. 
700 1 |a Berlin, Ira,  |d 1941-  |e introduction. 
830 0 |a Penguin classics. 
900 |a a1909434 
994 |a C0  |b PLF 
596 |a 1 3 6 10 11 12 14 16 18 20 21 26 29 31 32 35 36 37 38 40 42 43 44 45 47 48 50 51 52 53 55 56